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Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Archive for the ‘book reviews’ Category

Book reviews: Blood oil, China’s civil service

In the current issue of Governance, Frank Vogl reviews Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World by Leif Wenar.  Vogl says that the book “builds a compelling case for a trade boycott on oil, gas, gold, and other mineral exports from some 30 nations run by corrupt regimes.”  Read the review.

 

And Lina Vyas reviews Governing Civil Service Pay in China byAlfred M. Wu.   Wu “offers an incisive examination of how the government has attempted to shape a contemporary civil service system that in turn would improve state capacity and government legitimacy,” Vyas says.  Read the review.

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September 15, 2016 at 5:59 pm

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Understanding Europe’s refugee crisis

In the current issue of Governance, Mahama Tawat draws on two books on immigration — Frontiers of Fear by Ariane Chebel d’Appolonia and Survival Immigration by Alexander Betts — to examine Europe’s refugee crisis.  The recent surge of refugees into Europe “has triggered events whose historical parallel can only be found in the early hours of World War II,” Tawat says. Drawing on Francis Fukuyama’s 2013 contribution toGovernance, Tawat considers how shortfalls in state capacity have intensified the crisis.   Read the review.

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July 15, 2016 at 4:45 pm

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Book reviews: Challenging modernization theory, reviving Follett

In the current issue of Governance, Yi Feng reviews Dynamics Among Nations: The Evolution of Legitimacy and Development in Modern States by Hilton Root.  Root “challenges a major paradigm that has guided research in political and economic development: modernization theory.”  Read the review.

And Edoardo Ongaro reviews  Integrative Process: Follettian Thinking From Ontology to Administration by Margaret Stout and Jeannine Love.  “This book is a manifesto for the relaunch of Follettian thinking . . . A valuable effort to place it firmly on the public governance and administration agenda.”  Read the review.

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June 20, 2016 at 7:07 pm

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Book reviews: Corruption in India, China’s hunt for resources, public participation in the EU

In the current issue of Governance, Sean Yiath reviews The Hungry Dragon: How China’s Resources Quest is Reshaping the World, by Sigfrido Burgos Cáceres and Sophal Ear.    The book “exposes the leverage China holds over source countries and reveals the cleavages in domestic and international relations among the key players.”  Free access to the review.

Alvin Almendrala Camba reviews Participatory Governance in the European Union by Karl-Oskar Lindgren and Thomas Persson.  “Despite its limitations, this is a fresh and timely contribution to the governance literature.”  Free access to the review.

And Nafis Hasan of Azim Premji University reviews Corruption and Reform in India by Jennifer Bussell.   The book is a “bold attempt to identify the reasons for the difference in quality” of computerized service centers that were supposed to reduce corruption in Indian state governments.  Free access to the review.

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February 16, 2015 at 7:15 am

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Roundtable: What NPM accomplished in the UK

The current issue of Governance features a roundtable on A Government That Worked Better And Cost Less? byChristopher Hood and Ruth Dixon.  The book recently received the Brownlow Award from the U.S. National Academy of Public Administration.  “This is an important book,” says Per Laegreid. “An important implication is that public sector organizations cannot just copy private sector management tools and organizational forms and expect successful results.”  Read his review.   NPM “was sold to the world as science-based ‘best practice,” write Demetrios Argyriades and Pan Suk Kim. “After three decades, a new book has come to prick the bubble.”  Read their review.   ButNancy Roberts suggests that the book may overstate the “level of conceptual clarity or agreement” about what NPM actually involved.  Read her review.

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January 20, 2015 at 9:50 am

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Book reviews: The failings of democracy, and public-private partnerships

In the current issue of Governance, Alasdair Roberts reviews Breaking Democracy’s Spell by John Dunn.  Dunn renders “a harsh judgment on Western democracies . . . But there are reasons to think why it might not be fair.”  Read the review.

And Kai Chen of Zhejang University reviews The Routledge Companion to Public-Private Partnerships, edited by Piet de Vries and Etienne Yehoue.  “This compelling and thought-provoking volume is an excellent addition to the literature on public-private partnerships.”  Read the review.

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January 16, 2015 at 9:34 am

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Book review: Controlling tobacco around the globe

In the current issue of Governance, Paulette Kurzer of the University of Arizona reviews Global Tobacco Control: Power, Policy, Governance and Transfer by Paul Cairney, Donley Studlar and Hadii Mamudu.  The book examines two topics, Kurzer says: Why did it take governments so long to recognize the health consequences of smoking?  And why did policy action vary if the problem is the same across the globe?  The book “is a superb examination of an important question . . . [A] first-rate account of tobacco control that will be a standard text for years to come.”  Read the review.

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December 5, 2014 at 7:34 am

Posted in book reviews