The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Archive for the ‘commentary’ Category

Right to Know Day: materials for the classroom

September 28 is International Right to Know Day.  Mark the day by watching this debate between Charles Lewis and Bruce Cain on the question, “Is American government too open?”  The video is accompanied by commentaries from Governance arguing both sides of the question.  It is well suited for classroom use.

Written by Governance

September 9, 2016 at 8:34 am

Posted in commentary

Grindle: Goodbye to “good governance”

Governance has invited short essays to mark the upcoming thirtieth anniversary of the journal.  In her essay, Merilee Grindle questions the value of that ubiquitous concept, “good governance.”  The concept has been “progressively inflated” and encouraged “muddy thinking,” Grindle says, and made it harder to understand how governance can be changed for the better.  Read this 30th anniversary essay.

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June 30, 2016 at 4:43 pm

Peters and Campbell on founding of Governance

2017 will mark the thirtieth year of publication for Governance.  In a new commentary, B. Guy Peters and Colin Campbellrecall how the journal was established by IPSA’s Research Committee on the Structure and Organization of Government.  “The first several years were challenging,” say Peters and Campbell, “but we are pleased that after thirty years of hard work,Governance has become one of the leading journals in public administration and policy.” Read the commentary.

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June 23, 2016 at 4:42 pm

Does the US president need Congress’s approval to go to war? Commentaries and video

John Yoo at March 16 debate
Does the U.S. President need Congress’s approval to go to war?  John Yoo and Alberto Coll debate the question in new commentaries for Governance.  “As a matter of law, never,” says Yoo. “The Constitution creates a presidency that can respond forcefully to prevent serious threats to our national security without waiting for congressional approval.”Free access to Yoo’s commentary.  But Coll disagrees profoundly. “The historical record is clear: Only the U.S. Congress has the right to initiate major conflicts.”  Free access to Coll’s commentary.  Yoo and Coll debated in person at the University of Missouri on March 16.  Watch video of the debate here.

Written by Governance

April 27, 2016 at 7:13 pm

Posted in commentary

Afghanistan: Why statebuilding failed

Why has the project of statebuilding in Afghanistan proved to be such a failure?  Because of a misguided preoccupation with the build-up of “power-deploying institutions,” and the neglect of mechanisms for holding power-holders accountable.  So says Jennifer Brick Murtazashvili in the current issue of Governance. “Afghanistan illustrates how a fragile state requires enough capacity to defeat insurgents, but enough constraints to discourage officials from predation and abuse. Unfortunately, well-crafted constraints often seem like an afterthought, as state-building efforts obsess with building quick capacity.”  Free access to the commentary.

Written by Governance

April 15, 2016 at 5:54 pm

Posted in commentary

Debate: Is American government too open?

It’s been 50 years since the U.S. Congress adopted the Freedom of Information Act, which provides access to documents held by federal agencies. Since 1966, Congress has adopted many other laws designed to promote openness. But has the United States gone too far, undermining the capacity of public officials to solve our major problems?

In a commentary for Governance,Bruce Cain of Stanford University says yes, American government is now too open.  And Charles Lewis of American University responds in a second commentary: No, it isn’t.

Screen Shot 2016-03-19 at 3.11.14 PMCain and Lewis engaged in an in-person debate about their commentaries at the University of Missouri on March 15.  Watch the debate here.

Written by Governance

March 19, 2016 at 1:52 am

Posted in commentary, Conferences

Commentaries on power of US presidents to authorize war

 

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John Yoo at March 16 debate

Governance has just published two commentaries tied to a March 16 debate organized by the Kinder Institute for Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri.  Details about the debate here.  John Yoo argues that US presidents don’t need Congress’ approval to go to war.  Read his commentary.  And Alberto Coll disagrees, insisting that the US Congress must approve major wars.  Read his commentary.

 

Written by Governance

March 4, 2016 at 1:38 pm

Posted in commentary, Conferences