The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Archive for the ‘Current issue’ Category

Measuring state capabilities: It’s all settled, then.

Just joking.  In the current issue of Governance, Robert Rotberg argues against the idea that we can gauge the quality of governance without looking at actual effectiveness in service delivery.  Read the research note.  And Craig Boardman agrees, showing how it is possible to assess policy outcomes in “national mission areas.”  Read the research note.

Written by governancejournal

September 15, 2014 at 11:14 am

Posted in Current issue

Policy bubbles: How they grow and why they matter

“One of the most common mistakes” in policymaking “revolves around using the popularity of a policy as an indirect measure of its worth,” Moshe Maor says in the current issue of Governance.  This can encourage herd behavior and the growth of “policy bubbles” — a policy overreaction that builds over time, until it eventually bursts.  Maor develops the concept and explains how it challenges ideas about the rationality of policymaking.  Read the article.  Maor also discusses his article in a recent post on London School of Economics’ British Politics and Policy blog.

Written by governancejournal

September 10, 2014 at 11:13 am

Posted in Current issue

How governments use control signals to manage immigration tensions

Offshore detention center on Australia's Christmas Island
Detention center, Christmas Island

In many countries, there is widespread public pressure for tighter immigration controls.  But key constituencies also want more liberal rules for certain kinds of immigrants, like skilled workers.  In the current issue of Governance, Chris Wright examines how Australia’s government manages this conflict.  It uses “control signals to draw attention to their successful efforts at controlling unwanted forms of immigration,” Wright says.  “This proved to be a critical factor in its later success in permitting entry to large numbers of skilled workers.”  Read the article.

Written by governancejournal

September 1, 2014 at 11:11 am

Posted in Current issue

What does ordoliberalism really require?

Walter Eucken, a founder of ordoliberalism

The ideas of ordoliberalism, first developed in Germany in the mid-twentieth century, have had a marked revival since the Global Financial Crisis, write Mathias Siems and Gerhard Schnyder in the current issue of Governance.  Commentators from both left and right say that more regulation on ordoliberal principles is needed.  But there is confusion about what ordoliberalism really requires.  Siems and Schnyder clarify the core ideas and show how ordoliberalism can “form the basis for a sounder conception of economic regulation” in the wake of the crisis.  Read the article.

Written by governancejournal

August 11, 2014 at 6:27 am

Posted in Current issue

How do women fare under Islamist rule?

Blaydes 1Some academic studies say that Islamists are effective at providing social services for women, while others contend that Islamic groups “support pro-male policies that disadvantage the well-being of women.”  In the current issue of Governance, Lisa Blaydes examines the effects of Islamist rule in neighbourhoods of Greater Cairo.  “Women subject to governance by the Islamic group enjoyed better outcomes in reproductive health” than in comparable neighborhoods ruled by strongmen, Blaydes concludes.  Read the article.

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August 2, 2014 at 6:43 am

Posted in Current issue

Book reviews: Ghana’s oil, and new perspectives on public service

In the current issue of Governance, Franklin Obeng-Odoom reviews Governance of the Petroleum Sector in an Emerging Developing Economy, edited by Kwaku Appiah-Adu.  The book “provides a one-stop shop account of some of the key issues relating to the governance of Ghana’s young oil industry.”  Read the review.

And Sarah Holsen reviews New Perspectives on Public Services: Places and Technology by Christopher Pollitt.  “Pollitt’s goal,” says Holsen, “is to explore how, in the face of technological change, the provision of public services shapes the places in which they are located, how the characteristics of places influences how services are provided, and how the location of government and its services impact the landscape of interaction between government and citizen.” Read the review.

Written by governancejournal

June 23, 2014 at 6:42 pm

Posted in Current issue

How a new global gender-balance norm affects cabinet composition

The representation of women in cabinets and legislatures has increased sharply since the 1990s, although it still falls far short of parity with men.  What explains the recent shift?  In the current issue of Governance, Suraj Jacob, John Scherpereel and Melinda Adams argued that international norms have played an important role.  Their study relies on an original global database of cabinet ministers from 1979 to 2009.  “A gender-balanced decision-making norm has become embedded in the world polity,” they argue.  But the norm still has limits: it is “more likely to generate gains in low-prestige cabinet positions than in high-prestige positions.”  Read the article.

Written by governancejournal

June 16, 2014 at 6:42 pm

Posted in Current issue

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