The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Archive for the ‘Current issue’ Category

Is the Westminster model dead?

For more than a century, the Westminster system was one of the most influential models of public administration in the world.  Countries in the “Westminster world” claimed the benefits of a strong executive and an impartial, professional bureaucracy.  The October issue of Governance examines the health of the Westminster model today.  In their introduction to the special issue, Dennis Grube and Cosmo Howard pose the big question: Is the model “under threat, dying, or already dead?” Read the introduction to the special issue.

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September 27, 2016 at 8:32 am

Posted in Current issue

How instrument constituencies promote solutions

 In the current issue of Governance, Daniel Béland andMichael Howlett explore the process by which policy goals are matched with policy solutions.  An important type of actor in this process is the “instrument constituency” — a group that is dedicated to the promotion of a particular kind of solution, regardless of problem context.  Béland and Howlett use cross-sectoral and cross-national case studies to demonstrate the usefulness of this new concept in explaining the dynamics of the policy process.  Read the article.

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September 5, 2016 at 5:55 pm

Posted in Current issue

Why the history of frontier states still matters today

Present-day state capacities can be shaped profoundly by historical processes of state formation.  In the current issue ofGovernance, Roberto Stefan Foa and Anna Nemirovskaya examine how the distinctive histories of “frontier states” — like the United States, Canada, Russia and Brazil — influence state capacities today.  “Frontier zones have ongoing lower levels of public order and public goods provision,” the authors find.  They explain why settlers resisted attempts to impose governance over frontier regions, opting instead for lower fiscal capacity and more limited provision of public goods. Read the article.

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August 25, 2016 at 5:54 pm

Posted in Current issue

When are citizens willing to fight corruption?

When will citizens step forward to help battle corruption?  In the current issue of Governance, Caryn Peiffer and Linda Alvarezexamine the question based on data collected from over seventy countries.  In non-OECD countries, pervasive corruption discourages citizens from actively opposing it.  But citizen attitudes do change when confidence in a government’s anti-corruption efforts grows.  Read the article.

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July 6, 2016 at 4:44 pm

Posted in Current issue

How election of women improves services for women

More than one hundred countries have adopted electoral quotas to address gender inequality in representation.  But does this have an effect in policy outcomes?  Using data from survey of Moroccan and Algerian parliamentarians, Lindsay Benstead finds that quotas do matter: they create mandates, increasing responsiveness to women.  “Controlling for other factors, quota-elected women are more responsive to females than parliamentarians of either sex elected without quotas.”  Read the article.  Benstead also discusses her article in the Washington Post.

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June 5, 2016 at 7:02 pm

Posted in Current issue

How EITI promotes reform in corruption-prone countries

Why do so many governments in corruption-prone countries voluntarily sign up for greater scrutiny under the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative?  In the current issue of GovernanceElizabeth David-Barrett and Ken Okamura argue that the answer “lies in a complex story about how norms spread and take hold in international politics.”  Once transparency has been established as a global norm, the EITI serves as “an important tool for reformers in government to signal their good intentions, helping them to motivate their peers to comply.”  Read the article.

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June 1, 2016 at 7:01 pm

Posted in Current issue

How professionalized legislatures level the playing field

On the Quantitative Peace blog, Alissandra Stoyan and and Sarah Shair-Rosenfield discuss their just-published article in Governance: “In our article, we argue that when legislators are highly professionalized they bring individual skills and resources to office from previous work or governing experiences, and these factors may help level the playing field to empower the legislature vis-à-vis the executive.”  Read the blog comment.

Written by Governance

May 18, 2016 at 7:07 pm

Posted in Current issue