The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Archive for the ‘Current issue’ Category

When are citizens willing to fight corruption?

When will citizens step forward to help battle corruption?  In the current issue of Governance, Caryn Peiffer and Linda Alvarezexamine the question based on data collected from over seventy countries.  In non-OECD countries, pervasive corruption discourages citizens from actively opposing it.  But citizen attitudes do change when confidence in a government’s anti-corruption efforts grows.  Read the article.

Written by Governance

July 6, 2016 at 4:44 pm

Posted in Current issue

How election of women improves services for women

More than one hundred countries have adopted electoral quotas to address gender inequality in representation.  But does this have an effect in policy outcomes?  Using data from survey of Moroccan and Algerian parliamentarians, Lindsay Benstead finds that quotas do matter: they create mandates, increasing responsiveness to women.  “Controlling for other factors, quota-elected women are more responsive to females than parliamentarians of either sex elected without quotas.”  Read the article.  Benstead also discusses her article in the Washington Post.

Written by Governance

June 5, 2016 at 7:02 pm

Posted in Current issue

How EITI promotes reform in corruption-prone countries

Why do so many governments in corruption-prone countries voluntarily sign up for greater scrutiny under the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative?  In the current issue of GovernanceElizabeth David-Barrett and Ken Okamura argue that the answer “lies in a complex story about how norms spread and take hold in international politics.”  Once transparency has been established as a global norm, the EITI serves as “an important tool for reformers in government to signal their good intentions, helping them to motivate their peers to comply.”  Read the article.

Written by Governance

June 1, 2016 at 7:01 pm

Posted in Current issue

How professionalized legislatures level the playing field

On the Quantitative Peace blog, Alissandra Stoyan and and Sarah Shair-Rosenfield discuss their just-published article in Governance: “In our article, we argue that when legislators are highly professionalized they bring individual skills and resources to office from previous work or governing experiences, and these factors may help level the playing field to empower the legislature vis-à-vis the executive.”  Read the blog comment.

Written by Governance

May 18, 2016 at 7:07 pm

Posted in Current issue

Polycentrism improves Kenyan water management

After independence, Kenya adopted the standard practice of centralized control over water resources to improve agricultural productivity.  By the 1980s, the centralized model was in disarray.  In the current issue of Governance, Elizabeth Baldwin,Camille Washington-Ottombre, Jampel Dell’Angelo,Daniel Cole, and Tom Evans explain what happened next. Kenya pursued a polycentric approach to water governance, in which decision making about water resources is shared among multiple, overlapping local, regional, and national authorities. The new approach has proved to be better suited to Kenya’s variable social and ecological conditions and the available resources of its administrative agencies.  Read the article.

Written by Governance

April 20, 2016 at 5:57 pm

Posted in Current issue

Privileged pluralism: How major interests keep power

In the current issue of Governance, Anne Skorkjaer Binderkrantz, Peter Munk Christiansen, and Helene Helboe Pedersen examine the dynamics of interest group activity in Denmark, based a unique large data set.  They reject the simple notion that the availability of multiple arenas assures diversity in interest group representation.  The evidence shows that “when it comes to the major players, cumulative effects are evident; that is the same groups dominate across all arenas.”  They call this system of “privileged pluralism.” Free access to the article.

Written by Governance

March 10, 2015 at 7:50 pm

Posted in Current issue

Why governments adopt strong transparency laws

When are governments likely to adopt strong transparency laws?  Greg Michener says that too much of the existing research has tried to answer that question by looking only at countries with single-party or small-coalition governments.  In those cases, political leaders often have strong reasons for resisting openness.  The dynamic is different when the number of parties controlling government rises.  In broad multiparty coalitions, transparency laws can be used as tools for monitoring coalition partners.  Michener uses Brazil’s experience with freedom of information law to illustrate his argument.  “The leaders of large coalitions,” Michener concludes, “may find FOI particularly appealing because it avoids the high political costs of ‘shadowing ministers’ or traceable leaks.  It delegates diffuse monitoring responsibilities to citizens.”  Free access to the article.

Written by Governance

February 15, 2015 at 7:50 am

Posted in Current issue

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