The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Book reviews: Environmental policy, corruption, and the World Bank’s attempt to understand political economy

  In the current issue of Governance, Leigh Raymond of Purdue University reviews The Bet by Paul Sabin. This “well-written and deeply researched” book uses the personal conflict between biologist Paul Ehrlich and economist Julian Simon “as a lens for explaining developments in environmental politics since the 1960s.”  Read the review.

 

Peter Larmour of Australian National University reviews Different Paths to Curbing Corruption, edited by Jon S.T. Quah.  This set of five country case studies “complements and extends current econometric approaches to understanding corruption and relates it to broader macrohistorical themes in development.”  Read the review.

Thomas Carothers and Diane de Gramont of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace review Problem-Driven Political Economy Analysis: The World Bank’s Experience, edited by Verena Fritz, Brian Levy, and Rachel Ort.  The book is a “far-reaching, informative examination” of the World Bank’s attempt to improve its analysis of the political feasibility of proposed programs.  All of the case studies “bring up a central problem: clientelism.”  And the book emphasizes the need for more attention to “politically responsive policy design.”   Read the review.

Written by Governance

August 20, 2014 at 9:08 am

Posted in book reviews

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